0xcAB2
November 18th, 2021

There are two ways to grow your audience. One way is to find new people to follow you. Can you think of the second?

A much overlooked part of audience growth for content creators is retention, which refers to how good you are at keeping your audience around and engaging with your content. Adding new followers is only worthwhile if they actually keep following you, consuming your content and interacting with it. Without good retention, your business is doomed to fail. This concept is core to the growth strategies of top startups, and luckily can also be applied to the world of content businesses.

In this article I will share four reasons why you should really care about retention, how you know if you have good retention, and what you can do to improve it. As always, I’m not here to share tactics but provide a strategic framework you can use to think about your content business. If you’re still at the early stages of your journey as a content creator, make sure to first check out my article on content-market fit, or in other words ‘finding a niche’.

0xcAB2
November 18th, 2021

Take a moment to ask yourself — how does your audience grow?

Your answer to this question is your growth hypothesis. Regardless of whether you want to grow your audience on Instagram, YouTube, Facebook or Twitter, it is the single most important question you need to be able to answer as a content creator after you have found content-market fit (more on that here).

While content-market fit is about figuring out who your audience is and what content serves their needs, your growth hypothesis is your plan for how to reach more and more people over time. It is called a hypothesis because it is a strategy that you need to test to see if it works and adapt over time. Growth loops have become an increasingly common framework for answering the growth hypothesis in tech startups.

I’m not here to give you tactical advice for hustling your way to more followers - as a tech product manager and startup entrepreneur my goal is to bring valuable strategic frameworks from the startup world into the realm of content businesses.

0xcAB2
November 18th, 2021

“Make something people want” - Paul Graham, founder of Y Combinator

Product-market fit is a fundamental and beautifully simple concept known in tech startups, but it hasn’t yet had enough influence in the wider business world. The framework of market-fit is an incredibly useful tool for understanding how to create value for customers and grow the business, and it is very applicable for content creators.

As a tech product manager and startup entrepreneur, I hope to bring some of my learnings from the startup playbook into the world of content creation. In this post, I will explain the concept of product-market fit, how to get there and how to know you’ve found it. When you finish reading, you’ll be able to think of your business in the framework of market fit and use it to grow your success.

I’ll be referring to ‘content-market fit’ when I mean ‘product-market fit’ in the context of content creation businesses, and ‘product-market fit’ refers to the original concept as applied to tech startups.

0xcAB2
November 18th, 2021

There are few words more hated on the internet than “influencer”. Try googling “why I hate the word influencer” and you will find one blogpost after another with this exact title. Some of them explain why they hate being called an influencer, and others why they hate influencers, but they all have one thing in common — “influencer” is a bad word.

I was very curious when I started hearing this, because this space (whatever we want to call it) is growing massively in terms of people involved and value created. I’m going to try to chronicle and break down why this word is so hated, what it really means and what this industry is all about.

Non-influencers seem to hate the word influencer because they kind of hate influencers. The word conjures images of reality celebrity, artifice, undeserved riches, wastefulness and vanity. The particular brand of ‘influencer’ imagined is the fashion/lifestyle/travel variety.

“I too hate the word “influencer”. I believe it leads Instagrammers to have an inflated sense of self-importance. It’s both annoying and pretentious.” — unnamed Redditor